Sunday, June 18, 2017

What The War Demonstrated





The war of 1812-15 did much to demonstrate the truth that a free government may also be a strong government; the freest nation in the world the strongest. [Source]

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

On Retreat From Fort George


British Military and Naval Records (RG 8, C Series) - INDEX ONLY
Microform: c-11837 [Image 5327]




McDonald, David.  Private.  Provincial Dragoons.

Re Horse taken by the enemy on retreat from Fort George, 14 - 6 - 1813.

C. 704. pp. 148, 147, and 131-159.


Friday, June 2, 2017

Affidavit For Timothy Baker



Affidavit of Timothy Howe, of Quincy, Branch, Michigan...who had known Timothy Baker since 1810.  Timothy Howe and Timothy were enrolled in the same company in the War of 1812. [Source]

Source


Timothy Baker volunteered about 15 September 1813 and discharged about 15 December 1813.

Timothy Baker's affidavit taken in Livingston County, New York (he was a resident of Sparta), stated that Timothy Baker was a sergeant in Company of Light Infantry commanded by Captain Daniel Calkins (also mentioned Colonel George Fleming) and that he volunteered at Aurelius, Cayuga County, New York.  He was honorably discharged about 15 December 1813 in Upper Canada at Fort George. [Source]

14 April 1871 Timothy Baker was a resident of Geneseo, Livingston, New York.

Timothy Baker (Jr.) was my 1st cousin, 6x removed.




Sunday, May 7, 2017

Sabres And Smoke


"Decide the fate of North America"


Source

The creators of a board game designed to feature the War of 1812 sent an e-mail to me regarding their product, Sabres and Smoke (screen shot from their website, https://www.hand2handgames.com;  their instagram account is @h2h_entertainment).

Pictures were also sent (used two of four):
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Thursday, April 27, 2017

The Defences Were Entirely Inadequate


Source


From The Battle Of York....

The fact of York being the seat of Government of the Province of Upper Canada gave it an importance greater than it really merited, for it then consisted of only a small village of less than one thousand inhabitants, where houses were built mainly about the banks of the River Don. 

The defences of the town, if indeed they can be properly so termed, were entirely inadequate. 

Old Fort York, existing to-day very much in its outlines as it did in 1813. In this were the maga- 
zines, official residences and the barracks of the garrison.